Wild Child

104.7 The Point welcomes Expectations Tour

Wild Child

Future Generations

Mon, Dec 03, 2018

Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Higher Ground Ballroom

$17 advance | $20 day of show

This event is all ages

Wild Child
Wild Child
Wild Child won't settle. For seven years now the Austin-based ensemble has carried its infectious blend of indie-pop and infectious melodies across the international music scene, charting viral hits and wrapping their arms around a diverse and dedicated fan base. But earlier this year when the band set out to make their fourth studio album, they found they had their hands full: After half a decade of maturation, the group had grown beyond its traditional writing and recording process.

“We had too many ideas for how we wanted to make this record” says Kelsey Wilson, the group’s lead vocalist and violinist. She shrugs. “So we said, ‘Why not just do all of them?’”

The group realized this offered an exciting opportunity to make a kind of record bands rarely get right: To take a new, multispectral approach to writing and recording that went beyond simply trying to engineer success. The band made a list of their favorite musicians who were also great producers in their own right — choosing ones they thought would shine a new and unique light on specific compositions — and then Wild Child set about chasing their album from studio to studio all over the world, never saying no to an idea.

Now a seven-piece pop mini-orchestra (Wilson on violin and vocals; Alexander Beggins on ukulele and vocals; Sadie Wolfe on cello; Matt Bradshaw on keyboards, trumpet, and harmonica; Tom Myers on drums; Cody Ackors on guitar and trombone; and Tyler Osmond on bass), Wild Child formed in 2010 when the group's core duo of Wilson and Beggins wrote and released their first album, Pillow Talk.

“We’re all growing and changing and learning new tricks,” Beggins says. Wilson responds, “Yeah, there’s no right or wrong way to do anything.” Her own record, though, is proof she’s wrong.
Future Generations
Future Generations
It’s fair to say Future Generations’ music contradicts the assumption that music always reflects the objective time and space in which its creators operate. When penning lyrics at Fordham University, songwriter/singer Eddie Gore shirked references to collegiate lawns, Jesuit lineage and other specific milieu of college life. Instead, he wrote tender refrains to an introverted struggle with finding individual meaning in an infinitely vast world (moving to New York City from Nashville will do that to you) and sharing those anxieties with loved ones.

“For me college was not so much about learning a specific trade or skill. It was more about discovering who I want to be and learning about life in general,” says Eddie. “I’m from the south. I’m from Nashville. It’s not a small town, but it’s not New York. That’s why a lot of my lyrics are about bigger things, kind of “life” questions.”

By the time graduation rolled around in the spring of 2015, Future Generations expanded to include bassist and fellow Fordham graduate Devon Sheridan, along with original members Mike Sansevere and Eric Grossman. With school in the rearview mirror, Future Generations spent its first few post-college months in Eli Janney’s (Boys Against Girls) Brooklyn studio, finishing a full-length record. Along with two tracks from the 2014 EP, “Polysun,” the band recorded eight new tunes for the eponymous debut.

On Future Generations, which was produced by Claudius Mittendorfer (Temples, Neon Indian), Eddie’s lyrical transfixions reveal an eagerness to burst forth from the confines of collegiate ennui, still pondering the same existential quandaries that unfailingly tend catch his imagination. And the fuel for his escape comes from a formulaic synthesis of soaring guitar hooks and pulsing synths. It’s the melody that usually comes first, and the group has happily relied on that recipe for almost five years.

“With “Stars,” I had a reaction (to the music) that wasn’t about one particular thing, it was about discovering something broad about yourself,” says Eddie. "You have people who come along with you and people who don’t. The melody made me feel that.”

As a result, Future Generations flaunts an ambitiously large scope for a band used to writing and recording in the cramped confines of college dormitories and email chains. While continuing to grow, the band added a fifth member, drummer Dylan Wells, and four of the five moved into an apartment near Prospect Park. The quintet toured the Midwest this fall with Savoir Adore and will continue to tour in support of the debut album in 2017.
Venue Information:
Higher Ground Ballroom
1214 Williston Road
South Burlington, VT, 05403
http://www.highergroundmusic.com/